pdCountry international reference and demographics database

International Reference and Demographics

The world is becoming a smaller place and a handy collection of key country data is invaluable. pdCountry fits the bill in good fashion representing the entire globe. This easy-to-use, comprehensive, and up-to-date reference package provides core country information, GeoCoding data, and a host of useful demographic variables. It is available in Pro and Standard editions.

Uses for pdCountry are innumerable, and no company or organization that does international business should be without it. Financial companies, travel agents, webmasters, news agencies, research institutions, schools, students, and government will find it of particular value.

Pro and Standard

Both editions include the same core country information and GeoCoding data. The difference is the Pro version comes equipped with 43 years of demographics (1970–2012) while the Standard edition has the most recent ten years (2003–2012).

WE COVER THE GLOBE

pdCountry is a proprietary resource not duplicated elsewhere. For more than 20 years our software has been utilized by businesses and organizations around the world in applications you use every day.

Comprehensive global database:
  • 2,400 standard country and area records
  • World
  • 28 regions
  • 211 countries
  • 5 former countries
Core country information:
  • ISO numeric country (or region) code
  • Regions
  • Country (or region) name
  • Country abbreviations
    • ISO Codes
    • FIPS Code
    • International License Plate Code
    • Olympics Initials of Nations
  • National capital
  • Language
  • Citizenry (noun and adjective)
  • National currency
  • ITU country calling code
  • Internet portals
Latitude and Longitude coordinates in 3 formats
Land and water area
117 demographic variables in multiple subject areas:
  • Population
  • GDP and its breakdown
  • Value added by economic activity
  • Implicit price deflators
  • GNI
  • Exchange rates
  • 10 years of demographics (2003–2012)
  • Demographics are calculated in multiple ways, including in the national currency, US dollars, current prices, constant 2005 prices, rates, and/or shares
Excellent resource for research

Pro only features

8,000 additional country and area records
2 additional former countries
33 additional years of demographics (1970–2002)
Other benefits:
  • Designed for compatibility
  • Comes in multiple file formats: Comma Delimited (CSV), Fixed Length, and DBF
  • Full documentation
  • Perpetual Site License—allowing installation on all computers in the same building within a single company or organization
  • Available for immediate download

SPECIFICATIONS

pdCountry is a proprietary resource not duplicated elsewhere. For more than 20 years our software has been utilized by businesses and organizations around the world in applications you use every day.

Logo
pdCountry international reference and demographics database logo
Sku
Pro: 6CR200P | Standard: 6CR200S
Product Name
pdCountry Pro | pdCountry Standard
Version number
2.0
Description
International reference and demographics software
Total records*
Pro: 10,517 | Standard: 2,450
Zipped size**
Pro: 20.1 MB | Standard: 5.6 MB
Extracted size**
Pro: 91.2 MB | Standard: 22.2 MB
File formats included
Comma Delimited (CSV), Fixed Length, and DBF
Availability
Immediate download
List price
Pro: $95 Buy | Standard: $59 Buy

*The record count is the total number of records contained in each of the three included file formats.

**The zipped and extracted sizes show the combined total size of all product files.

Compatibility
pdCountry utilizes only the ANSI character set (ASCII values 0 to 127 and extended values 128 to 255) and comes in multiple file formats to insure compatibility. It employs United Nations (UN), International Organization for Standardization (ISO), International Olympic Committee (IOC), International Telecommunication Union (ITU), and top-level domain (TLD) data coding conventions. While coverage is very high, information is not provided for every field in every record.
Optional developer license
Available (Questions... | Apply...)

DOCUMENTATION

For better usability of our software we create precision documentation with examples—so you don’t have to be worry. The user guide includes detailed instructions, file layouts, the site license, and additional information useful for both business applications and those employing the product for research.

To view the PDF user guide you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader version 4.05 or higher installed on your computer or device. This is a free program downloadable from the Adobe website.

View documentation

SAMPLE

A random sample of the software database is available for download. It includes records from the main database as well as the written documentation from the product and other information. The sample is extracted from the Pro edition. The Standard edition does not include demographics prior to 1970 .

The database come in three file formats to insure compatibility with any database system. Each format contains the same data. Formats include: comma delimited (CSV), fixed length, and DBF.

The written documentation, including the site license, comes in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. To view these documents you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader version 4.05 or higher installed on your computer or device. This is a free program downloadable from the Adobe website.

Download sample

Comprehensive global database

The following countries and regions (in bold) are provided. There are 29 regions (including the World), 211 current countries, and seven former countries (italicized). Two former countries, both Yemens, are only in the Pro edition:

World
Africa
Eastern Africa
Burundi
Comoros
Djibouti
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Kenya
Madagascar
Malawi
Mauritius
Mozambique
Rwanda
Seychelles
Somalia
South Sudan
United Republic of Tanzania: Mainland
Uganda
Zambia
United Republic of Tanzania: Zanzibar
Zimbabwe
Middle Africa
Angola
Cameroon
Central African Republic
Chad
Congo
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Equatorial Guinea
Gabon
Sao Tome and Principe
Northern Africa
Algeria
Egypt
Libya
Morocco
Sudan
Tunisia
Southern Africa
Botswana
Lesotho
Namibia
South Africa
Swaziland
Western Africa
Benin
Burkina Faso
Cabo Verde
Câte d’Ivoire
Gambia
Ghana
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Liberia
Mali
Mauritania
Niger
Nigeria
Senegal
Sierra Leone
Togo
Americas
Latin America and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Anguilla
Antigua and Barbuda
Aruba
Bahamas
Barbados
British Virgin Islands
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Montserrat
Puerto Rico
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Trinidad and Tobago
Turks and Caicos Islands
Central America
Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
South America
Argentina
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Ecuador
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Suriname
Uruguay
Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)
Northern America
Bermuda
Canada
Greenland
United States
Asia
Central Asia
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Eastern Asia
China, People’s Republic of
China: Hong Kong SAR
Japan
China: Macao SAR
Mongolia
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
Republic of Korea
Southern Asia
Afghanistan
Bangladesh
Bhutan
India
Iran, Islamic Republic of
Maldives
Nepal
Pakistan
Sri Lanka
South-Eastern Asia
Brunei Darussalam
Cambodia
Indonesia
Lao People’s Democratic Republic
Malaysia
Myanmar
Philippines
Singapore
Thailand
Timor-Leste
Viet Nam
Western Asia
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Bahrain
Cyprus
Georgia
Iraq
Israel
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Oman
State of Palestine
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Syrian Arab Republic
Turkey
United Arab Emirates

Yemen
Europe
Eastern Europe
Belarus
Bulgaria
Czech Republic
Hungary
Republic of Moldova
Poland
Romania
Russian Federation
Slovakia
Ukraine
Northern Europe
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
Iceland
Ireland
Latvia
Lithuania
Norway
Sweden
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Southern Europe
Albania
Andorra
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Croatia
Greece
Italy
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Malta
Montenegro
Portugal
San Marino
Serbia
Slovenia
Spain
Western Europe
Austria
Belgium
France
Germany
Liechtenstein
Luxembourg
Monaco
Netherlands
Switzerland
Oceania
Australia and New Zealand
Australia
New Zealand
Melanesia
Fiji
New Caledonia
Papua New Guinea
Solomon Islands
Vanuatu
Micronesia
Kiribati
Marshall Islands
Micronesia (Federated States of)
Nauru
Palau
Polynesia
Cook Islands
French Polynesia
Samoa
Tonga
Tuvalu
Kosovo
Netherlands Antilles
Former Czechoslovakia
Former Ethiopia
Former Sudan
Former USSR
(Pro only) Yemen: Former Yemen Arab Republic
(Pro only) Yemen: Former Democratic Yemen
Former Yugoslavia

Core country information

Extensive core information is provided for countries and regions:

ISO numeric country (or region) code

Countries and areas are identified with a three-digit ISO 3166-1 numeric code. First introduced by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 1981 and published as ISO 3166-1 since 1997, these codes are identical to the numeric codes developed and maintained by the United Nations (UN). The advantage of numeric coding over alphabetic abbreviations is script independent, making it useful for people or systems employing non-Latin scripts.

An ISO numeric country code has not yet been assigned to the Republic of Kosovo, which received full sovereignty only in September 2012 and is not currently included in the UN statistical structure.

Regions

These areas are geographical groupings of countries as defined by the United Nation Statistical Division (UNSD) and include the World as its own region. The regions each currently functioning country is located in are shown in a series of six fields. Countries are identified in at least two region areas (other than World), a top-level region, which is the continent or continental grouping the country is located in (such as Africa or Asia); and a region subdivision (such as Western Africa or South-Eastern Asia). An additional third region subdivision is offered for Latin American and Caribbean countries. For each of the up to three regions there is a three-digit ISO 3166-1 numeric code and the name of the region.

Former countries do not have region information. This is also true of the Republic of Kosovo, which received full sovereignty only in September 2012 and is not currently included in the UN statistical structure; as well as Netherlands Antilles, which was dissolved by the Kingdom of the Netherlands in 2010, but all of the constituent islands remain part of the kingdom under a different legal status and the term is still used to refer to these islands.

Country (or region) name

The name of countries and regions are shown in three formats. One with the United Nations (UN) approved English spelling, another with the English spelling of the formal fullname (such as Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and Kingdom of the Netherlands), and a third with the English spelling of the informal common name (such as Ethiopia and Netherlands). Non-English spellings are not provided because they would require non-Latin scripts rendering the database incompatible in many systems.

Country abbreviations

A series of up to five common alphabetic one- to three-character abbreviation codes is provided for each currently functioning country. These include the two-character ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 abbreviation, three-character ISO 3166-1 alpha-3 abbreviation, two-character FIPS abbreviation, one- to three-character international license plate code, and three-character IOC Initials of Nations.

Alphabetic codes are not provided for regions or former countries (except Netherlands Antilles). This is also true of the Republic of Kosovo which received full sovereignty only in September 2012 and is not currently identified by permanent country codes; however, ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code “XK” is used by the European Commission, Switzerland, the Deutsche Bundesbank, and other organizations as a temporary country code for the new nation.

ISO Codes

International Organization for Standardization (ISO) country abbreviation codes were first introduced in 1974 and published as ISO 3166-1 in 1997 and include both two- and three-character abbreviations. The two-letter codes are the most widely used, and used most prominently for the Internet’s country code top-level domains (TLD) with a few exceptions.

FIPS Code

The two-character Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) abbreviation codes are drawn from FIPS 10-4 country codes for Countries, Dependencies, Areas of Special Sovereignty, and Their Principal Administrative Divisions. While mostly replaced by ISO standards, they were formerly used by the US government for geographical data processing in many publications, such as the CIA World Factbook.

International License Plate Code

The international license plate country codes are one to three characters in length. They are maintained by the United Nations (UN) as the Distinguishing Signs Used on Vehicles in International Traffic (DSIT) and are authorized by the UN’s Geneva Convention on Road Traffic of 1949 and the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic of 1968. Many vehicle abbreviation codes created since the adoption of ISO 3166 coincide with ISO two- or three-letter country codes. License plate codes are displayed in bold block uppercase on a small white oval plate or sticker near the number plate on the rear of a vehicle.

Olympics Initials of Nations

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) uses three-character country abbreviation codes to refer to each group of athletes that participate in the Olympic Games. These Initials of Nations were first introduced in the 1956 Winter Olympics and 1960 Summer Olympics. Each usually identifies a National Olympic Committee (NOC); but there are several codes that have been used for other reasons in past Games, such as teams composed of athletes from multiple nations, or groups of athletes not formally representing any nation. Some of the IOC codes are different from the ISO 3166-1 alpha-3 codes. Other sporting organizations, such as the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA; or, in English, International Federation of Association Football), use similar country codes to refer to their respective teams, but with some differences. Still others, such as the Commonwealth Games Federation and Association of Tennis Professionals, use the IOC list verbatim.

National capital

The capital city or district is provided for currently functioning countries and the historic national capital city or district is listed for each former country. An exception is Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China which does not have a formal capital (but the City of Victoria, now called Central in popular usage, was historically regarded as the unofficial capital).

Language

The major language or languages are indicated for currently functioning countries and former countries in two fields with the two-character lower-case ISO 639-1 alpha-2 language abbreviation code(s) and the name of the language(s). Inclusion generally conforms to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) practices, but smaller languages for which there is no two-character abbreviation are excluded. If more than one language is identified, information is provided as comma delimited lists. The order listed is not necessarily representative.

The original standard for language abbreviation codes was introduced in 1967, and split into parts in 2002, with ISO 639-1 alpha-2 becoming the new standard. The last code included, added in 2003, was “ht” representing Haitian Creole. Many multilingual websites use these codes to prefix the URL for specific language versions of their sites; for example, “en.Wikipedia.org” is the English version of Wikipedia.

Citizenry (noun and adjective)

The commonly accepted noun and adjective for referring to the citizenry of each currently functioning country and each former country. In some cases multiple options are offered.

National currency

The national currency of each currently functioning country and the former currency of each former country is shown, including the three-character ISO 4217 alpha-3 national currency abbreviation code, the name of the national currency, and the name of the national currency’s basic subunit.

IMPORTANT: the currency listed is utilized in demographics tabulated for national currencies.

International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4217 alpha-3 was established over a period of time from 1973 for use in international trade, commerce, and banking. It is maintained is by SIX Interbank Clearing, based in Zurich, Switzerland, on behalf of the ISO and the Swiss Association for Standardization (SNV). The first two characters is usually the ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country abbreviation and the third is usually the initial of the currency itself; for example, Japan’s currency code is “JPY”, “JP” for Japan and “Y” for Yen. This eliminates the problem caused by the names dollar, franc, pound, and others being used in different countries, each having differing values. If a currency is revalued, the last letter is changed to distinguish it from the old currency (in some cases, the third letter is temporarily the initial for “new” in the country’s language).

ITU country calling code

International Telecommunication Union (ITU) country calling codes (or dial in codes) are defined by ITU-T recommendations E.123 and E.164. They are also called International Direct Dialing (IDD) codes and International Subscriber Dialing (ISD) codes.

The dial plan of a telephone network usually designates a special trunk access prefix code, the international dialing prefix, which must be dialed before the country calling code to select access to the international circuits of the network. The prefix is specific to the country from which the caller is dialing, but often it is “00” or “011”. Generally, a user must consult local directories for the access code if a number is listed beginning with a plus sign (“+”), which means the digits following it are a country calling code.

Internet portals

Up to three Internet portals are supplied for currently functioning countries with the country code Internet top-level domain (TLD), the main government URL, and the URL for the national postal service or corporation.

A top-level-domain (TLD) is a domain name in the Domain Name System (DNS) that is a direct subdomain of the DNS root zone; for example, “.com” is a TLD and “.us” is the country code TLD for the United States (and “.gov” is the TLD for United States governmental entities and agencies, hence “us.gov” is the United States main government URL). Country code TLDs were created in the early days of the Domain Name System and pre-date Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN).

Latitude and Longitude coordinates

Any location on Earth can be described with two numbers—its latitude and its longitude. If a pilot or a ship’s captain wants to specify a position on a map, these are the coordinates they would use. In actuality, these coordinates are angles, measured in degrees, minutes, and seconds of arc.

The database provides internal point latitude and longitude coordinates for current countries and regions presented in multiple formats.

Internal point latitude and longitude coordinates are a calculated point that is at or near the geographic center of a country or area, at or near a main population center of a country or area, or at or near a national capital. For some irregularly shaped countries and areas (such as those shaped like a crescent), the calculated coordinates may be located outside the boundaries of the entity. In such instances, the internal point is identified as a point inside the boundaries nearest or near the calculated coordinates.

The following are the three formats provided for each set of coordinates; the examples are for the same latitude and longitude in the Fiji Islands.

Land and water area

The database presents the total area size, total land area, and total water area characteristics for currently functioning countries and regions. Values are entered in whole square kilometers. Area sizes are not supplied for former countries because they no longer exist on maps.

117 demographic variables in multiple subject areas

The population, GDP (and its breakdown), value added by economic activity, implicit price deflator, GNI, and exchange rate demographics provided are among the most important parts of the package. 117 variables are available, and statistics are calculated in multiple ways, including in the national currency, US dollars, current prices, constant 2005 prices, rates, and/or shares.

The demographic variables are drawn from United Nations (UN) aggregate statistical data and are the latest information available. The Pro version has 43 years of demographics data covering 1970 through 2012 while the Standard edition has the most recent ten years covering 2003 through 2012.

List of demographics